Shared Drives are Big Investments


Corporate Shared Drives: > $2k per Terabyte

From startups to giant enterprises, the quick and easy way to save and share information has always been with shared drives. From the floppy disk to portable thumb drive, employees would pass on information like documents and files, from one hand to another. Employees on a daily level won’t even think twice about their shared drives creating duplicates, or documents that aren’t version controlled, and how much storage space they’re using.

However the question today is: How much are we paying for the convenience of shared drives?

As an organization, are you wondering where your money is going for the convenience of your employees using shared drives? Let’s take a look.

Storing Information Cost $$$

Whether your company is hosting an on premise solution, or paying monthly for their cloud service, data storage is expensive. The going rate for shared drive storage will run a company about $2 a gb. When thinking in terms of terabytes, that’s going to run you $2,000. The equation is simple here, the more data you have equals the more storage you’ll need.

The issue with shared drives is that they’re inherently difficult to control on a management level. They tend to belong to the individuals that use them and those individuals dictate what information is stored.  Also, there are no technical restrictions as to what can be stored onto a shared drive thus corporate regulations are difficult to apply. What this leaves your company with is a drove of data that is likely to be a duplication of other duplications.

If your employees are loading these duplications up into your server, next thing you know, you’ll have whole terabytes full of unmanageable files and documents. The more regularly your company utilizes personal shared drives, the more you’ll have to pay for storing all of that bad data.

Reduced Productivity Cuts into Profits

With shared drives, there’s no confirmation that what you find, is the latest version of the file or documents you need. The lack of version control reduces productivity when an employee has to double check or even triple check to make sure the file is correct. This waste of time cuts into productivity which cuts into the profits that an employee is bringing in, either through sales or support.

Without regulating and managing the information that gets stored, shared drives not only create duplications, they save unfinished files or older versions of the file. When an employee is looking for Mr. John Doe’s files, they might very well pull up a half finished report.

Not controlling duplications and versions being stored, make it nearly impossible for document searches to be done. Employees will spend a significant amount of time on company dime, searching for the correct and most up to date version of a file.

Better Save Up for Litigation Risks

The use of shared drives is an extremely high risks practice. Legal issues of any manner are costly and having an inadequate data management practice could result in numerous fees, failed audits and litigation risks.

With each and every item that comes from a shared drive going into your server, compliance and retention policies must be applied. In order to be legally compliant, this data must then be managed through its entire lifecycle and defensibly disposed. If your employees are storing important information on their personal shared drives and those records or files never make it up into your servers, then critical information can be lost at any moment. If your employees are storing redundant information files, then legally, your organization must apply compliance, retention, and manage the lifecycle of all redundant files.

Whether your organization is being proactive by setting corporate rules and steps to minimize shared drive risks, that time spent is costing money. If your organization loses information, that will cost money. If your organization fails to manage the data stored in and from shared drives, the cost of fees, failed audits and litigation risks will add up. This is cash that’s just flying out the front door.

From storage costs, to loss profits and litigation fees, shared drives are racking up a major bill within organizations. Don’t let their convenience fool you into thinking that this is a manageable practice because it’s not and everyday, organizations are forking over big bucks.